Thyroid and Your Health

by Carrie Raab on May 10, 2012

Thyroid and Your Health

How vital is your thyroid? Why is this little gland so important to your health? What exactly is the thyroid gland and what is its function/purpose in the human body?  The thyroid is a part of the endocrine system and this gland regulates metabolic processes in the body. Its main function is to produce hormones, T3/T4, that are released into the bloodstream.  The thyroid gland is controlled by the pituitary and hypthalamus gland.

Why is the thyroid gland so important?

The hormones, T3/T4 are released into the bloodstream and are transported to every cell in the body.  These hormones enter the body cells and control the metabolism that takes place. The thyroid also controls other vital functions such as digestion, circulation, immune function, hormone balance, and emotions. Your thyroid is one of the most important glands in your body. It controls the way you metabolize food, the way you use energy, lose and gain weight, how well or poorly you sleep, and much, much more. If your thyroid is not functioning properly, you will have several side effects/health issues.

Foods That Support a Healthy Thyroid:

Kale, spinach, asparagus, brazil nuts, lentils, whole grains, eggs, pumpkin seeds, salmon and tuna

If you already have thyroid imbalance, talk to your practitioner about using supplements before a prescription. The problem with prescriptions like Synthroid (levothyroxine) is that once you go on them, your thyroid backs down, and it can be difficult to get off of thyroid replacement drugs. 

If you are looking for a natural alternative, Thyromin is a great supplement. This natural essential oil supplement was developed to help nourish the thyroid, balance metabolism, and reduce fatigue. It contains a combination of specially selected glandular nutrients, herbs, amino acids, minerals, and essential oils. All of the essential oils are therapeutic-grade quality and are perfectly balanced to bring about the most beneficial and nutritional support to the thyroid. Young Living’s Thyromin contains a proprietary blend of bovine-derived thyroid powder, adrenal extract, and pituitary extract, as well as herbs, amino acids, minerals, and essential oils that support healthy thyroid function.

Thyromin for thyroid gland

If you’re not already familiar with this best-selling, all natural Thyromin, thyroid-supporting supplement, take a look at the ingredient information below:

  • Iodine is an element needed for the production of thyroid hormones. Because the body does not produce iodine on its own, it can only be obtained through diet or supplements. Iodine is a key component of Thyromin, giving you 1,158 mcg per serving.
  • Vitamin E supports enzymes in the body that convert inactive thyroid hormones into active thyroid hormones. Likewise, Thyromin contains 30 IUs, 100 percent of the daily value.
  • Under-performing thyroids can also cause potassium deficiency, which can lead to imbalances in many other important minerals in the body. Thyromin contains 66 mg of potassium.
  • The essential oils in Thyromin—peppermint, spearmint, myrtle, and myrrh—may have a synergistic, protective effect on your hormonal and immune systems.
  • Peppermint essential oil is one of the oldest and most highly regarded herbs and is known for aiding digestive efficiency and supporting the liver and respiratory system.
  • Spearmint essential oil is a rich antioxidant that helps support the nervous system and overall balance in the body.
  • Myrtle essential oil is supportive of the respiratory system, skin, and hair, and it has been researched for its effects on glandular imbalances.
  • Myrrh essential oil contains some of the highest levels of sesquiterpenes, which are a class of compounds that have a direct effect on the hypothalamus, pituitary, and amygdalae, the seat of our emotions.

Your thyroid doesn’t operate well under continued stress. If you need suggestions on coping with stress, read here.

Your thyroid can be over or under active. Symptoms include:

Under active- hypothyroidism

  • Fatigue
  • Sluggishness
  • Increased sensitivity to cold
  • Constipation
  • Pale, dry skin
  • A puffy face
  • Hoarse voice
  • An elevated blood cholesterol level
  • Unexplained weight gain
  • Pain, stiffness or swelling in your joints
  • Muscle weakness
  • Heavier than normal menstrual periods
  • Brittle fingernails and hair
  • Depression

Over-active Hyperthyroidism

  •    significantly accelerate your body’s metabolism
  •  causes sudden weight loss
  •  a rapid or irregular heartbeat
  •  sweating
  •  nervousness
  •  irritability

Your health is vital. Take good care of it! Take good care of your thyroid gland. I hope this information has been helpful. :)

To order Thyromin -Supplement, Click HERE

Information received from http://www.mayoclinic.com. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat or cure. 

{ 12 comments… read them below or add one }

Sheri September 9, 2013 at 3:07 am

I had thyroid cancer therefore my thyroid was removed. I am on Sythriod and have been since 2009. I am wondering if taking Thyromin I could eventually go off the Synthriod?

Reply

Carrie Raab September 10, 2013 at 3:37 pm

Sheri, I am not a Dr. and cannot prescribe or diagnosis, but I personally am using Thyromin and other essential oils and my levels are great! :)

Reply

Leslie July 5, 2014 at 3:20 pm

Thanks for sharing Carrie. Glad to hear Thyromin is working well for you. So do you have your thyroid or has it been removed or eradicated with radiation? Just wondering… Thanks!

Trisha January 10, 2013 at 9:55 pm

Is it safe for pregnancy?

Reply

Carrie Raab February 26, 2013 at 1:46 pm

Hi Trisha,
With everything, please check with your doctor as I am not one. I do not diagnose, treat, or prescribe. Many people use natural remedies for thyroid regulation. You may show her the bottle/ingredients. Blessings! :)

Reply

lisa June 11, 2012 at 6:37 pm

I am fairly thin. (I want to be, he he)
Could that mean I have an overactive thyroid, but i am also usually cold. Could taking Thyromin reduce my metabolism??

Reply

Carrie Raab June 11, 2012 at 8:38 pm

Hey Lisa! I would have your thyroid checked by your Dr. to see if it is hypo or hyper. Once you know, then you can go the natural route, if you desire. Hope that helps. :)

Reply

cynthia chapman May 23, 2012 at 3:19 pm

I have hypothyroidism. I wanted to add something and I didnt see it mentioned in your article. I have had thyroid problems for 12 years now. Two years ago I was diagnosed with Gastroparesis. Even though my thyroid levels have been stable since being diagnosed, my GI doctor believes this is why I have Gastroparesis. It is an unpredictable chronic illness that has no cure. All you can do is try and manage your symptoms. Those change on a day by day basis. Thought I would just share this with your readers.

Reply

Carrie Raab May 30, 2012 at 2:42 am

Hey Cynthia! Thank you for sharing your heart and information with us. Blessings to you! I appreciate your feedback.

Reply

Larri May 10, 2012 at 6:59 pm

Great information, Carrie! I had a thyroid scare last year. I was fatigued, always cold, and had to clear my throat constantly. After a visit to the ENT, he thought it was my thyroid. I had bloodwork completed and a CT scan, and thankfully, no major problems other than a bit deficient in thyroid production. I was able to get my levels back to normal through proper nutrition. Know what the main culprit was? I had switched my table salt to Sea Salt…which was not iodized. When you buy Sea Salt, make sure to read the label. Look for one that has iodine added to it. Just that minor change can make a difference in your thyroid levels. :)

Reply

Carrie Raab May 10, 2012 at 11:18 pm

Such a great testimony! Thanks for sharing! Thyromin has Iodine in it, so that is a testimony of the product and knowing why it is needed in the body and why your body did what it did… wow! Thanks so much for your feedback! I appreciate you sharing so others will know and these little tips are HUGE! Blessings to you!

Reply

Carrie Raab July 7, 2014 at 9:59 pm

Hey Leslie,
I do have my thyroid:)

Reply

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